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  #1  
Old 06-08-06, 02:37 PM
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Question blown glass beads.. Help!! how is it done

In my ever growing collection of beadmaking books, I have noticed that some of the picture captions mention blown glass beads. How do you incorporate glass blowing with flamework bead making, is it possible ?.... if so what equipment/tools are needed? and where might i find instructions on how to do it?
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Old 06-08-06, 03:09 PM
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You can acheive blown beads by blowing them on a glass tube. Bandhu Dunham's book on Contemporary lLampworking has a good section on all kinds of tricks in the world of bead making. It's like the "bible" of lampworking. You can get the book at most suppliers. Good luck.... Deb
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Old 06-08-06, 04:15 PM
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Blown glass bead can also refer to furnace blown beads, which you need a hot shop to do. Examples are chevron beads and the ones that look a bit like hard candy. They are constructed like milliflore but on a blown cylinder, which is then pulled out into a long tube. The beads are then sliced off and polished and, in the case of chevron beads, faceted so you can see the layers of colors. This is an extremely over simplistic explanation, but I hope you get the idea.
Go to http://www.froghollow.org/store/manufacturerview/144 for an explanation of how Lucy Bergamini of Vitriesse Glass does it. Alas, I can't find any images of them.
Years ago, I think it was in Lapidary Journal, there was a pictoral article on constructing a chevron that involved turning the cylinder inside out. The idea is that all the colors you put on the outside becomes layers on the inside and the solid color cylinder becomes the outside skin. It was very cool and the beads were spectacular. I wish I could remember who the artists were.
Some of the results of furnace blown beads can be approximated in torch work, especially if you can polish facets.
Maria
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Old 06-12-06, 06:57 AM
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I either use coil pot technique to get a hollow bead (moretti or boro) or blow small section of boro tubing. the tubing is then either flame cut or even more fun cut on my ring saw, or shocked with diamond sheers, then fire polished in the flame.
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Old 06-12-06, 02:35 PM
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Originally Posted by rosglassworld
I either use coil pot technique to get a hollow bead (moretti or boro) or blow small section of boro tubing. the tubing is then either flame cut or even more fun cut on my ring saw, or shocked with diamond sheers, then fire polished in the flame.
ro
wow thats so cool,i can do the coil pot thing ..I was wondering if it was possible to do like glass blowers do but in miniture. I tend to blow holes in the boro tubing everytime i try it...maybe i dont get it hot enough or blow too hard !!

Last edited by eternal flame; 06-12-06 at 02:40 PM. Reason: forgot part of the question! silly me
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Old 06-12-06, 03:45 PM
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for tubing blow slowly , heat up a section of tubing very evenly, un even heat will cause holes to pop (hot spots expand faster than cool ones) rotate as you blow. I have played with a gather of 104 coe on the end of break line cable (stainless tube from aid auto stores 5.00$) its very cool, got a starter bubble then added more glass, hard to consistantly get the starter bubble to maintain center, i spin on a bench roller. main issue is uneven heat. i could likely spend lots of time practicing that and still not be so good at it. really fun though!
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Old 07-11-06, 07:27 PM
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sorry new guy... what is a coil pot?
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Old 07-11-06, 07:49 PM
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Hey, New Guy!
A coil pot is a pottery term in which a snake of clay is coiled around to make a pot. Sort of like a squashed spring. Hold that image for a sec. Now take two of those clay pots and place them opening to opening to make a sphere. Now imagine the pots are bead size and hollow and a mandrel is going down the middle from top to bottom.
Over simplified instructions follow: You start by making 2 narrow disc beads on the same mandrel from 1/2 - 1 inch apart. (Keeping it all evenly hot takes practice.) A hot rod of glass is gently touched to one of the discs and wrapped around it in a coil, but instead of making the disc taller, you let it go towards the middle. Then you work on the other disc the same way. If the glass gods are kind the two halves will merge into a sphere, without sticking to the mandrel or having a hole that will make the whole thing collapse. I know I saw a tutorial somewhere - but I am not finding it. Rats.
Maria

Last edited by glasspmaria; 07-11-06 at 07:51 PM. Reason: lousy proofreading
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Old 07-11-06, 08:51 PM
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I wrote an article about "Free Coiling" which is pot coiling off the end of a blow pipe. The article can be found in the Glass Line archives............Vol 18, No 5...Dec/Jan 2004/05 Jim may have a copy of it you could download. It's has pictures in a step-by-step. To do pot coiling (or a form of it) on a mandrel, glasspmaria has a pretty good description. It's a fairly hard technique to learn, but once mastered, it can free you to do a lot of other things. Take it slow and just know that it takes awhile to learn. Let us see the results!!! Deb BTW - I'm teaching a class at Tecnolux in Brooklyn, NY at the end of September that will include that technique. Might be worth your while. Connect is http://www.tecnoboro.com/Tecnolux_Classes_2006.pdf
OK..That connect isn't working...so just go to www.tecnoboro.com
click on the download of classes and class list and scroll down till you come to Deborah Carlson. Hope this helps. Jim, what am I doing wrong?? This connect works when I plug it inot my computer. Must be the glass elves are up to their old tricks again!! Deb
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Last edited by Jim; 07-16-06 at 12:15 PM.
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Old 07-13-06, 10:50 AM
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wow that is intriguing! thanks so much! so far I have only managed to get a lopsided sphere going before one side ballons way out an gets a hole.. but you know what they say... practice makes perfect.... thanks again
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